This work by Max Weber is an abstract masterful, compact composition with two figures in the background

Max Weber

American, 1881–1961

Interior, c. 1910

Watercolor and gouache on paper

5 x 4 ½ inches

Signed lower right

 

SOLD

Max Weber was born in Bialystok, Russia, and settled in Brooklyn. His artistic vision developed at the Pratt Institute under Arthur Dow, who introduced his students to non-Western traditions. In 1905 he traveled to Paris, becoming one of the first American artists to be influenced by European modernism. Weber’s friends included Pablo Picasso, Robert Delauney, and Henri Rousseau. Weber appreciated the ideas of these (and other) vanguard artists but was most influenced by Cézanne’s unique depiction of space.

Weber was one of the first Americans to bring modernism to the United States when he returned in 1909. His work was not well-received by the American art establishment (a source of bitterness to the artist) but he persevered. Weber experimented with different styles throughout his career, though he always managed to create works that were distinctly his own.

Interior is a masterful, compact composition made after his return from Paris. The subject—an intimate encounter—is a rather striking one for Weber, who was known to have led a more conventional life as compared to other avant-garde artists of his time.

This work by Max Weber is an abstract masterful, compact composition with two figures in the background