In this work by George L. K. Morris, geometric planes are overlaid on fragmented, abstracted faces and helmets, black lines suggesting rifles, and a wedge of the American flag.

George L. K. Morris

American, 1905–1975

Invasion Barge, 1943

Oil on canvas

10 x 14 inches

Signed lower right

 

SOLD

During World War II, Morris strove to convey the urgency of the conflict in his own abstract idiom. He completed a series of war-themed paintings—including Invasion Barge—that were featured in a 1944 exhibition at the Downtown Gallery in New York. Invasion Barge employs Morris’s characteristic flat geometric planes overlaid on fragmented, abstracted faces and helmets, black lines suggesting rifles, and a wedge of the American flag. These figurative elements retain the artist’s commitment to nonobjective expression while clearly referring to combat. Morris’s works of this period—the only sustained investigation of figuration during his mature career—suggest that addressing the war was an aesthetic imperative for the artist.

In this work by George L. K. Morris, geometric planes are overlaid on fragmented, abstracted faces and helmets, black lines suggesting rifles, and a wedge of the American flag.